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Stomach Ulcer

Abdominal Pain

By

Healthgrades Editorial Staff

What is abdominal pain?

Abdominal pain is any pain or discomfort that occurs between the lower chest and the groin. Commonly referred to as the “belly,” the abdomen consists of many organs, including the stomach, intestines, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, esophagus, and numerous blood vessels. Abdominal pain may be generalized, occurring throughout the abdomen, or it may be present in a small area of the belly.

Abdominal pain is a symptom of a wide variety of mild to serious diseases, disorders and conditions, such as indigestion, stress, infection, gallstones, inflammation, intestinal obstruction, peptic ulcer, and cancer. Abdominal pain can also occur as a side effect of medication.

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Depending on the cause, abdominal pain can last briefly, such as when it occurs from indigestion due to eating rich food. Abdominal pain can also last for a longer period of time, such as when it is due to chronic pancreatitis, stomach cancer, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long-term abdominal pain may be continuous or occur sporadically.

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Abdominal pain can be described as mild to severe, acute, ongoing, or cramp-like. While most people will experience abdomen pain in their lifetime, it is rarely caused by a serious medical problem.

However, abdominal pain that is associated with vomiting blood, bloody stools, dizziness, abdominal distention, fainting, shortness of breath, or yellowing of the skin (jaundice) can be a sign of a serious, potentially life-threatening condition and should be immediately evaluated in an emergency setting. If your abdominal pain is persistent or causes you concern, contact a medical professional.

Medical Reviewers: William C. Lloyd III, MD, FACS Last Review Date: Aug 31, 2016

© 2016 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

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Medical References

  1. Kuhn M, Campillos M, Letunic I, Jensen LJ, Bork P. A side effect resource to capture phenotypic effects of drugs. Mol Syst Biol. 2010;6:343. Epub 2010 Jan 19.
  2. Collins RD. Differential Diagnosis in Primary Care, 5th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Williams, 2012.

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