How Much Does a Tummy Tuck Cost?

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A tummy tuck sounds like a quick and easy office procedure. So how much could it cost? The truth is a tummy tuck is serious surgery. The medical name for it is abdominoplasty. It's plastic and reconstructive surgery. You need a highly trained surgeon for the procedure. A tummy tuck is an expensive surgery that your insurance policy probably doesn’t cover. 

Insurance Coverage

Most people choose to have a tummy tuck to flatten, firm and smooth out their tummies. You may want this surgery if you have a flabby tummy due to aging, pregnancies, or frequent weight fluctuations. Most insurance companies will consider this cosmetic surgery. You may want it, but you really don’t need it. Because of that, insurance won't pay.

However, sometimes insurance will cover at least part of the cost. This could be true if your abdominal muscles are very weak and you develop a hernia. Insurance also might pay if you have a panniculus. That's a large flap of fat that hangs over your belly. You might get coverage if the panniculus is causing skin infections. 

Paying for a Tummy Tuck

Most of the time, people have to pay out of pocket for a tummy tuck. You should ask your surgeon about the cost. An average cost is about $5,800. However, the actual cost depends on a lot of factors. Your surgeon may charge more if he or she is very experienced. Prices also differ from one part of the country to another. Your surgery may cost more if you have more severe flabbiness and you need more reconstruction.

You also will have to pay for things beyond the surgery itself. This could include charges for anesthesia, use of an operating room, and follow-up care. You may have your surgery under general anesthesia or regional anesthesia. You may have it in a hospital, clinic or office. All of these factors will affect the cost. They are not included in the average cost. 

Factors affecting how much you pay for a tummy tuck:

  • Surgeon’s experience
  • Geographical location
  • Complexity of your surgery
  • Anesthesia (and the anesthesiologist’s charge)
  • Hospital or surgery center charges

What to Think About Before Surgery

Before you make final arrangements, set up time with your surgeon to go over the cost details. Get started with these questions:

  • Can you provide written details of all my costs, not just the cost of the surgery? 
  • Do the charges include my follow-up care? 
  • Do you have a payment plan available? 

Be sure to go over all the risks and benefits of tummy tuck surgery with your surgeon. Then, make sure the price is worth the benefit and the risks for you.

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Medical Reviewer: William C. Lloyd III, MD, FACS
Last Review Date: 2019 Jul 25
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

  1. Tummy tuck procedure steps. American Society of Plastic Surgeons. https://www.plasticsurgery.org/cosmetic-procedures/tummy-tuck/procedure

  2. Choosing a Cosmetic Surgeon. American Board of Cosmetic Surgery. http://www.americanboardcosmeticsurgery.org/patient-resources/choosing-a-cosmetic-surgeon/

  3. Tummy tuck cost. American Society of Plastic Surgeons. https://www.plasticsurgery.org/cosmetic-procedures/tummy-tuck/cost

  4. What is a tummy tuck? American Society of Plastic Surgeons. https://www.plasticsurgery.org/cosmetic-procedures/tummy-tuck

  5. While doing a tummy tuck, can an incisional hernia be repaired at the same time? The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. https://www.surgery.org/consumers/ask-a-surgeon/tummy-tuck-incisional-hernia-repaired-time

  6. Gurunluoglu R. Insurance coverage criteria for panniculectomy and redundant skin surgery after bariatric surgery: why and when to discuss. Obes Surg. 2009;19(4):517-20.