12 Celebrities Who Had Children Through Surrogates

  • Gabrielle Union and Dwyane Wade with baby at Miami Heat game
    Celebrities Put Surrogacy in the Spotlight
    High-profile parents who chose surrogacy and shared their stories have shined a spotlight on surrogate births in the United States. In 2015, the last year for which there are statistics, almost 3,000 babies were born through surrogacy—almost four times as many as just over a decade ago. Surrogacy is expensive and complex, but it is an avenue toward motherhood for women who are unable or medically advised not to carry a child. Here are some of the famous names who chose surrogacy and what they said about the experience.

  • Jimmy Fallon on The Tonight Show holding his children's book Baby
    Jimmy Fallon
    After struggling for five years to get pregnant, “The Tonight Show” host and his wife, Nancy Juvonen, welcomed daughter Winnie Rose in July 2013, followed by Frances Cole the following year. Both children were born via surrogate. “My wife and I had been trying a while to have a baby. We tried a bunch of things—so we had a surrogate,” Fallon told the “Today” show. Both egg and sperm were from Juvonen and Fallon, fertilized using in vitro fertilization (IVF), and implanted into a woman who acted as what’s known as a gestational carrier, so both children are genetically related to Fallon and Juvonen.

  • Tyra Banks posing for photo on red carpet
    Tyra Banks
    TV host, entrepreneur and model Tyra Banks and photographer Eric Asla are the parents of son York, born in 2016. After years of trying to become pregnant, the couple turned to gestational surrogacy. “As we thank the angel of a woman who carried our miracle baby boy for us, we pray for everyone who struggles to reach this joyous milestone," Banks posted on Instagram after the birth of her baby.

  • Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick on red carpet at Tribeca Film Festival
    Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick
    Sarah Jessica Parker gave birth to a child with husband Matthew Broderick at age 37, but when the couple tried to have a second baby, she couldn’t get pregnant. Parker, who was 40, had what is called secondary infertility, when women who have given birth are unable to conceive or carry another child. When Parker was 43, the couple decided to use a surrogate, and now have twins Marion and Tabitha. Multiple births are more common when doctors use IVF, because more than one embryo can be fertilized and implanted in the gestational carrier if the parents desire it.

  • Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka with their children at Smurfs 2 premiere
    Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka
    In 2010, multi-talented Neil Patrick Harris and his husband, actor and chef David Burtka, had twins via surrogacy. Doctors used their sperm and the eggs of a donor to create the embryos. “Two eggs, two embryos, one of mine, one of his,” is how Burtka described it to Oprah Winfrey. They knew the woman who carried the babies, and the personal and medical history of the anonymous egg donor. They do not know which parent is the biological father of which child, and Harris told Barbara Walters it doesn’t matter—he loves both children “implicitly.”

  • Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban at red carpet event
    Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban
    Nicole Kidman had two adopted children with ex-husband Tom Cruise, and at age 41, gave birth to a daughter, Sunday, with second husband Keith Urban. She had difficulty getting pregnant when she and Urban wanted another child, so daughter Faith was born in 2010 through a gestational carrier. "I've experienced motherhood in so many different ways," Kidman told CNN. "I've experienced adoption, birthing a child, and I've experienced surrogacy. When it comes to it, I just wanna be a mama."

  • Ricky Martin speaking at event
    Ricky Martin
    Singer Ricky Martin became a single dad via surrogacy in 2008. His twins, Matteo and Valentino, were born to a woman Ricky described to Vanity Fair as “angelic.” A few years later, he was ready for a daughter. In 2019, a girl, Lucia, was born via surrogate to Martin and his husband, artist Jwan Yosef. In both cases, the identity of the surrogate was kept private. A surrogate can be a friend or family member, but often matches are made through a surrogate agency that works with a fertility clinic. An increasing number of clinics offer gender selection through the IVF process.

  • Lucy Liu on red carpet at the Golden Globe Awards
    Lucy Liu
    Single mom and actress Lucy Liu welcomed son Rockwell in 2015 when she was 46, via a gestational carrier. “It just seemed like the right option for me because I was working and I didn’t know when I was going to be able to stop,” she told People magazine. Most people choose surrogacy when they are unable to conceive or safely carry a child to term, but Liu told CBS News, “It doesn’t matter the machinations of how things occur. How you love and parent a child is most important.”

  • Bill and Giuliana Rancic together on red carpet
    Guiliana and Bill Rancic
    TV host Guiliana Rancic and husband Bill wanted a family, but after failed IVF treatments followed by a miscarriage, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was medically unsafe for her to carry a baby, so the Rancics turned to surrogacy, and son Duke was born in 2012. When the couple was ready for a second child, they went back to the same surrogate. Surrogate pregnancies are no riskier than any other, but unfortunately their surrogate had three miscarriages. The Rancics said they were considering adoption, which Guiliana told People magazine would be a “beautiful gift.”

  • Chris Daughtry performing in concert
    Chris Daughtry
    Rock star Chris Daughtry and his wife, Deanna, had two kids but wanted more. Deanna, however, had undergone a partial hysterectomy and could not carry another child. The couple used their own eggs and sperm, carried to term by a gestational carrier. In 2010, they welcomed fraternal twins Adalynn and Noah. “Deanna and I are overjoyed about this double blessing,” Daughtry posted on his website after the birth of his new son and daughter.

  • Andy Cohen on the set of Watch What Happens Live
    Andy Cohen
    Host of Bravo’s “Watch What Happens Live,” 50-year-old Andy Cohen had a son, Benjamin, via surrogacy in February 2019. “I worked with an incredible surrogate,” he told People magazine. “Surrogacy is illegal in so many states, including New York.” (Only Michigan and New York prohibit compensated surrogacy, but many other states have vague or restrictive laws around it.) “I don’t understand why,” Cohen said. “It’s a voluntary process, obviously. My surrogate just viewed it as she was giving me the ultimate gift. She gave me life. So I’ll be forever indebted to her.” Because laws vary by state, it’s important to seek experienced legal representation if you are considering surrogacy.

  • Kim Kardashian on red carpet of The Cher Show
    Kim Kardashian West
    After two difficult pregnancies with life-threatening complications, Kim Kardashian West still wanted more children. She and husband Kanye turned to a well-documented surrogacy. Though some intended parents choose the gender of the baby, which is possible when using IVF, Kim told People magazine, “I just said, ‘Pick the healthiest one,’ and that was a girl.” Daughter Chicago was born in 2018. In early 2019, she and Kanye announced they were expecting another child, also via a surrogate.

  • Gabrielle Union and Dwyane Wade with baby at Miami Heat game
    Gabrielle Union and Dwyane Wade
    Actress Gabrielle Union has been candid about the struggles she and her husband, NBA star Dwyane Wade, experienced with infertility before welcoming daughter Kaavia James in 2018 via a surrogate. Union told Essence magazine she went through “eight or nine” miscarriages before being diagnosed with adenomyosis, a condition of the uterus that can affect fertility. The couple has said they want their story to inspire other couples going through fertility issues. “Every route to parenthood is perfect,” Union told Today Parents.

12 Celebrities Who Had Children Through Surrogates

About The Author

Nancy LeBrun is an Emmy and Peabody award-winning writer and producer who has been writing about health and wellness for more than five years. She is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists and the American Society of Journalists and Authors.
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  7. Intended Parents: Surrogacy Laws by State. American Surrogacy. https://surrogate.com/intended-parents/surrogacy-laws-and-legal-information/surrogacy-laws-by-state/
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Last Review Date: 2019 Mar 29
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