Your Guide to Treating Depression

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4 Ways Telehealth Appointments for Depression Will Simplify Your Life

  • Businesswoman using technologies at desk in home office
    Simplify your life by scheduling telehealth visits with your mental health provider.
    Telehealth for depression isn’t a new phenomenon, but it’s a lot more common in recent years. Telehealth involves connecting with your health care provider remotely, over video chat, phone call, or secure message. You might find some real benefits from trying out telehealth, including the convenience factor. Check with your provider to find out what options are available to you and what the technology requirements are. Telehealth, also called telemedicine, might be a very useful way for you to access the care you need.

  • Portrait of blond young woman using cell phone
    1. Telehealth removes a barrier to care.
    Sometimes, especially when you’re struggling with depression, it’s hard to get motivated or to get moving and make it to a therapy or psychiatrist appointment. You might feel like you just can’t get out of bed. Telehealth removes that obstacle for you. Knowing that all you have to do is log onto your computer or tap a link on your smartphone to connect with your provider might make it easier for you to keep your appointment–and get the care you need.

  • Woman Using Laptop Relaxing Sitting On Sofa At Home
    2. Telehealth removes the need to travel.
    One of the biggest advantages of telehealth appointments is the ability to access care from wherever you happen to be. Since all you have to do is log on, you don’t have to figure out the logistics associated with an in-person visit. There’s no need to arrange for transportation to and from an appointment at a doctor’s office or counseling center. You won’t need to make sure you have cash to pay for parking or transit. You don’t have to take as much time away from work, your family, or other responsibilities, either. This is especially useful if you need to make frequent appointments for help in treating your depression.

  • Young Hispanic man taking pill at kitchen table
    3. Telehealth can help you manage your medications.
    Some people use telehealth to participate in one-on-one therapy sessions with a mental health counselor. But many people also use telehealth to talk to their psychiatrist about managing the medication they’re taking for depression. Are you concerned about the side effects of the antidepressant or other meds you’re taking? Are you worried the dosage amount isn’t effective at the current level and wondering if you need to take a higher dose? Are you thinking about asking to switch to a different medication? Telehealth can help you get these types of concerns addressed, without the inconvenience of in-person appointments.

  • African American woman on computer at home
    4. Telehealth can make it easier to connect between appointments.
    Have you ever left your mental health care provider’s office, only to realize shortly afterward that you forgot to ask a question? Telehealth technology makes it easy for you to leave a message for your doctor through a secure patient portal and then get the answer in return. This can also be useful if you have a quick question or refill request.

Telehealth for Depression | Telemedicine for Depression

About The Author

Jennifer Larson has more than 15 years of professional writing experience with a specialization in healthcare. She has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Maryland and memberships in the Association of Health Care Journalists, the Society of Professional Journalists, and the Education Writers Association.
  1. Khatri N, Marziali E, Tchernikov I, Shepherd N. Comparing telehealth-based and clinic-based group cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depression and anxiety: a pilot study. Clinical Interventions in Aging. 2014;9:765-770. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4019624/
  2. Clinical Outcomes. American Psychiatric Association. https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/practice/telepsychiatry/toolkit/clinical-outcomes
  3. Depression. National Institute of Mental Health. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml
  4. Facts and Statistics. Anxiety and Depression Association of America. https://adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/facts-statistics
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Last Review Date: 2021 Jun 3
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