At Your Appointment

Cataracts Appointment Guide

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Ask the right questions at your next doctor’s appointment. Answer two questions below to personalize your appointment guide.
  • Do you have any other medical conditions, such as diabetes?
  • Is your vision interfering with daily activities, such as reading, working or driving?
  • Are you able to see well enough using your prescription glasses or lifestyle changes, such as magnifiers or bright lighting?
  • How would you rate your overall quality of life considering your vision at the present time?
  • Are you ready to consider cataract surgery?
  • Describe your vision changes or symptoms. Do you have dim vision, need brighter light to see, or have difficulty seeing at night?
  • When did you first notice problems or changes with your vision?
  • Are your vision problems constant or do they come and go?
  • Have your vision problems gotten worse recently?
  • What activities do you find difficult due to your vision problems?
  • Have you ever had an eye condition, injury or surgery?
  • What strategies have you tried so far to improve your vision? How much has this helped?
  • What new symptoms or vision problems are you experiencing?
  • Do my vision problems mean I have cataracts?
  • Could another condition be causing or contributing to my vision problems?
  • What tests do I need to diagnose cataracts?
  • What treatments are available for cataracts?
  • Are there lifestyle changes I can make to improve my vision?
  • What can I expect if my cataracts progress?
  • Is there any harm in waiting to do surgery later, or do I need it now?
  • How well will cataract surgery restore my vision? Are there any long-term concerns with cataract surgery?
  • Which type of cataract surgery is best for me? What are my lens options?
  • What does cataract surgery involve, including risks, recovery time, and activity restrictions?
  • Do I have any other eye conditions that could affect my cataract treatment?
  • Will I need to stop any of my medications before surgery?
  • Are my new or different symptoms an indication that my cataracts are getting worse?
  • Does my specific case of cataracts require surgery? When would you recommend surgery in my case?
  • How long after surgery does it take to recover good eyesight?
  • If I delay surgery, what other strategies can help my vision?
  • What exactly are cataracts and how do they affect vision over time?
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Cataract Surgery
Last Review Date: 2018 Sep 20
  1. Cataracts. American Academy of Ophthalmology. https://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/what-are-cataracts
  2. Cataracts. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cataracts/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20353795
  3. Facts About Cataracts. National Eye Institute. https://nei.nih.gov/health/cataract/cataract_facts
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