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Blackouts - Symptoms

By

Healthgrades Editorial Staff

What other symptoms might occur with blackouts?

Blackouts may accompany other symptoms, which vary depending on the underlying disease, disorder or condition.

Nervous system symptoms that may occur along with blackouts

Blackouts may accompany other symptoms affecting the brain and nervous system including:

  • Changes in hearing, taste or smell
  • Changes in mood, personality or behavior
  • Depression
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Dizziness or vertigo
  • Head injury
  • Headache
  • Loss of vision or changes in vision
  • Memory loss
  • Muscle twitching, spasms or seizures
  • Perspiration

Other symptoms that may occur along with blackouts

Blackouts may accompany symptoms related to other body systems including:

  • Body aches
  • Fever
  • Nausea with or without vomiting
  • Palpitations
  • Weight loss

Serious symptoms that might indicate a life-threatening condition

In some cases, blackouts may be a symptom of a life-threatening condition that should be evaluated immediately in an emergency setting. Seek immediate medical care (call 911) if you, or someone you are with, have any of these life-threatening symptoms including:

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  • Change in level of consciousness or alertness, such as passing out or unresponsiveness

  • Change in mental status or sudden behavior change, such as confusion, delirium, lethargy, hallucinations and delusions

  • Chest pain or pressure

  • Garbled or slurred speech or inability to speak

  • High fever (higher than 101 degrees Fahrenheit)

  • Paralysis or inability to move a body part

  • Respiratory or breathing problems, such as shortness of breath, difficulty breathing or inability to breathe, labored breathing, wheezing, or choking

  • Seizure

  • Worst headache of your life

Medical Reviewers: William C. Lloyd III, MD, FACS Last Review Date: Oct 16, 2016

© 2016 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

View Sources

Medical References

  1. Memory loss. Medline Plus, a service of the National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003257.htm.
  2. Amnesia. University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Health Topics. http://www.uihealthcare.com/topics/mentalemotionalhealth/ment3141.html.

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