Megan Freedman

What is LASIK?

LASIK stands for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis. It is a minor but technical surgical procedure used to correct certain types of blurry vision (called refractive errors), including farsightedness, nearsightedness, and astigmatism. To perform LASIK, doctors use a laser to remove very thin layers of the cornea to change its shape and produce clearer vision.

Light passes through the cornea (the clear layer that covers the iris) and the pupil before it is projected onto the retina in the back of the eye. Refractive errors are caused by light focusing in front of (hyperopia, or farsightedness) or behind (myopia, or nearsightedness) the retina. In astigmatism, the cornea has a slight “football” shape instead of a spherical shape. In addition, certain other types of blurry vision are caused by a misshapen cornea. LASIK changes the shape of the cornea, allowing it to more effectively focus light rays onto the retina.

LASIK is a common surgery with potential risks and complications, such as reduced vision, blurry vision, and halos. Less invasive treatment options, such as contact lenses and glasses, are available to you. Consider getting a second opinion about your treatment options before having LASIK.

Types of LASIK

The types of LASIK include: