Repatha's Dosage: What to Know

Medically Reviewed By Alex Brewer, PharmD, MBA

Repatha: Introduction

Repatha is a brand-name prescription medication that contains the active drug evolocumab. It belongs to a class of drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors. Repatha is a biologic drug, and it’s not available in a biosimilar form.*

This medication has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to lower the following:

  • the risk of stroke, heart attack, and the need for certain coronary artery surgeries, such as stenting, in adults with cardiovascular disease
  • the level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in adults with high cholesterol, including heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH)
  • the level of LDL-cholesterol in children ages 10 years and older with HeFH
  • the level of LDL-cholesterol in adults and children ages 10 years and older with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH)

In this article, you’ll find additional information about Repatha’s dosage and details on how to take the drug. For a comprehensive overview of Repatha, view this article.

* A biosimilar medication is a drug that’s similar to a brand-name biologic drug (the parent drug).

Finding a healthcare professional

If you’re interested in taking Repatha, search here to find a doctor who might prescribe it.

This article describes typical recommended dosages for Repatha. These dosages are provided by the drug’s manufacturer.

Your doctor will prescribe the dosage of Repatha that’s best for you.

Repatha: Dosage

Commonly recommended dosages for Repatha are shown below.

You should take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. They’ll recommend the dosage that’s best for your condition.

Repatha’s forms and strengths

The table below shows Repatha’s forms and strengths.

Form Administration Strength
solution in a single-dose prefilled syringe subcutaneous injection 140 milligrams per milliliter (mg/mL)
solution in a single-dose prefilled auto-injector subcutaneous injection 140 mg/mL
solution in a single-dose prefilled cartridge for use in the Pushtronex on-body infusion system subcutaneous injection 420 mg/3.5 mL

Typical recommended dosage and injection dosing schedule

The table below lists the typical dosing instructions for Repatha in adults. The dosage frequency is either once every 2 weeks (biweekly) or once per month (monthly).

Purpose Monthly dose Biweekly dose
to lower certain risks associated with cardiovascular disease in adults 420 mg 140 mg
to lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in adults with high cholesterol, including heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) 420 mg 140 mg
to lower LDL cholesterol in adults with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH)* 420 mg 420 mg

* For HoFH, the recommended starting dosage is 420 mg once monthly. After 12 weeks, your doctor may increase your dosage to 420 mg once biweekly.

Children’s dosage

The table below lists the typical dosages for Repatha in children ages 10 years and older.

Purpose Monthly dose Biweekly dose
to lower LDL cholesterol in children with HeFH 420 mg 140 mg
to lower LDL cholesterol in children with HoFH* 420 mg 420 mg

* For HoFH, the recommended starting dosage is 420 mg once monthly. After 12 weeks, your doctor may increase your dosage to 420 mg once biweekly.

Length of treatment

Doctors typically prescribe Repatha as a long-term treatment. You’ll likely take it long term if you and your doctor feel it’s safe and effective for your condition.

Repatha: Common questions about dosage

Below are some common questions related to Repatha’s dosage.

Is there a set cost per dose of Repatha?

What you pay for a dose of Repatha depends on:

  • your insurance coverage
  • where you fill your prescription for Repatha
  • whether you give yourself the injection or a healthcare professional administers it

Talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or insurance provider if you have questions about Repatha and cost. Additionally, this article has more information about Repatha’s cost.

What possible dosing options are available for Repatha?

Repatha’s dosing options depend on the condition being treated. Your doctor will determine the best dosing schedule for you. Possible dosages include:

  • 420 milligrams (mg) once per month
  • 140 mg every 2 weeks
  • 420 mg every 2 weeks

To learn more about Repatha forms and dosages, see the “Repatha: Dosage” section above.

Talk with your doctor about the Repatha dosing schedule that’s best for you.

How long do people typically stay on Repatha?

Repatha is typically taken long term. If you and your doctor determine it’s working well for your condition, you’ll likely take it long term.

Repatha: Missing a dose

If you miss a dose of Repatha, take the dose based on the following timing:

  • If it’s been 7 days or less since you missed a dose, take the missed dose. Then, resume your usual dosing schedule.
  • If it’s been more than 7 days since you missed a dose, follow this guidance:
    • For biweekly Repatha, skip the missed dose and take your next scheduled dose.
    • For monthly Repatha, take the missed dose and start a new schedule based on this date.

For more information about missed doses, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

View these medication reminder options to help avoid missing doses. You could also set an alarm or download a reminder app on your phone.

Repatha: Dosage considerations

Your doctor will consider several factors when prescribing the dosage for Repatha. These factors include:

  • the condition you’re taking Repatha to treat
  • the severity of your condition

Your prescribed dosage may also vary based on other medical conditions you have. For the recommended dosages, see the “Repatha: Dosage” section above.

Repatha: How to use

Repatha comes as a solution for subcutaneous injection at home. You or a caregiver will administer the injection after your healthcare professional shows you how.

Additionally, the manufacturer of Repatha provides step-by-step instructions for injecting the drug. You can read an overview and watch videos here.

The three dosage forms for Repatha are:

  • Prefilled syringe. You can view the instructions for its use here.
  • Prefilled Repatha SureClick auto-injector. It can take about 15 seconds to administer a dose. You can view the instructions for its use here.
  • Prefilled cartridge for the Repatha Pushtronex infusion system. It takes about 5 minutes to administer a dose. You can view the instructions for its use here.

As you prepare to inject Repatha, follow this guidance:

  • The solution needs to reach room temperature before use. Take a single dose out of the refrigerator and wait at least 30 minutes.
  • The solution should be clear to slightly yellow. Do not use it if:
    • the solution is expired
    • the solution is cloudy
    • any part of the injector or syringe is damaged

ACCESSIBLE DRUG LABELS

If you find it challenging to read the label on your prescription, tell your doctor or pharmacist. Certain pharmacies provide medication labels with large print or braille. They may also offer labels containing a scannable code that your smartphone can convert from text to speech. If your pharmacy doesn’t provide these choices, your doctor or pharmacist may be able to recommend a pharmacy that does.

Repatha: Overdose

For some drugs, taking more than the recommended dosage may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose. Do not take more Repatha than your doctor prescribes. For details about Repatha’s possible side effects, view this article.

For details about dosages in adults and children, review the “Repatha: Dosage” section above.

What to do if you take too much Repatha

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much of this drug. Also, you can call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. However, if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or a local emergency number. Or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Repatha: What to discuss with your doctor

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist for additional information about Repatha’s dosage. Keep in mind that the dosages presented in this article are typical dosages provided by the drug’s manufacturer. Your doctor will recommend the dosage of Repatha that’s right for you and your condition. Always follow the dosage that your doctor prescribes for you.

As with any medications you’re taking, do not change your Repatha dosage without a recommendation from your doctor.

In addition to discussing Repatha with your doctor, you may find the following articles helpful in learning more.

  • Overview of Repatha. For comprehensive details on Repatha, see this article.
  • Drug comparisons. To learn how Repatha compares with Crestor, read this article. And for information on how Repatha compares with Praluent, see this article
  • Information on side effects. If you’d like to know about possible side effects of Repatha, view this article.
  • Cost and savings options. For information about Repatha’s cost and ways to save on your prescription, read this article.
  • Details about high cholesterol. To learn more about high cholesterol, which Repatha is used to treat, see this article.

Disclaimer: Healthgrades has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.


Medical Reviewer: Alex Brewer, PharmD, MBA
Last Review Date: 2022 Dec 5
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