Lyrica's Dosage: What to Know

Medically Reviewed By Vrinda Rio, Pharm.D.

Lyrica: Introduction

Lyrica is a brand-name prescription medication that contains the active drug pregabalin. It belongs to a class of drugs called antiepileptics. Lyrica is available in a generic form.

This medication has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat:

In this article, you’ll find additional information about Lyrica’s dosage and details on how to take the drug. For a comprehensive overview of Lyrica, view this article.

Lyrica vs. Lyrica CR

Lyrica CR, like Lyrica, contains the active drug pregabalin. However, Lyrica CR is an extended-release medication that releases the active drug into your body slowly over time.

Lyrica CR is approved only to treat nerve pain associated with diabetic neuropathy or shingles. Additionally, Lyrica CR has differences from Lyrica in recommended dosages.

This article focuses only on the dosages of Lyrica. If you have questions about Lyrica CR dosage, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Finding a healthcare professional

If you’re interested in taking Lyrica, search here to find a doctor who might prescribe it.

This article describes typical recommended dosages for Lyrica. These dosages are provided by the drug’s manufacturer.

Always follow the dosage of Lyrica that your doctor prescribes.

Lyrica: Dosage

Commonly recommended dosages for Lyrica are shown below.

You should take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. They’ll recommend the dosage that’s best for your condition.

Lyrica’s forms and strengths

Lyrica comes as an oral solution or capsule. It is available in the following strengths:

  • oral solution:
    • 20 milligrams per milliliter (mg/mL); each bottle of solution contains 473 mL (16 ounces)
  • oral capsule:
    • 25 mg
    • 50 mg
    • 75 mg
    • 100 mg
    • 150 mg
    • 200 mg
    • 225 mg
    • 300 mg

Typical recommended dosages for nerve pain, including diabetic neuropathy

Usually, doctors will prescribe a low dosage of Lyrica at the start of treatment. Then, they’ll adjust the dosage over time if needed. Ultimately, your doctor will prescribe the smallest dosage of Lyrica that gives the desired effect.

Adult dosage

The table below shows recommended dosages for treating nerve pain in adults.

Condition Starting dosage Maintenance dosage Maximum dosage
nerve pain associated with diabetic neuropathy 50 mg, three times per day 50 mg to 100 mg, three times per day 100 mg, three times per day
nerve pain associated with spinal cord injury 75 mg, two times per day 75 mg to 150 mg, two times per day 300 mg, two times per day
nerve pain associated with shingles • 75 mg, two times per day, or
• 50 mg, three times per day
• 75 mg to 150 mg, two times per day, or
• 50 mg to 100 mg, three times per day
• 300 mg, two times per day, or
• 200 mg, three times per day

As the table above shows, your doctor may change to a maximum dose, if needed. This increase may apply to the dosage for nerve pain associated with diabetic neuropathy, spinal cord injury, or shingles.

Your doctor can help determine the best dosage to treat your nerve pain condition. If you have questions about your specific dosage, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Typical recommended dosages for fibromyalgia and certain seizures

Usually, doctors will prescribe a low dosage of Lyrica at the start of treatment. Then, they’ll adjust the dosage over time if needed. Ultimately, your doctor will prescribe the smallest dosage of Lyrica that gives the desired effect.

Adult dosage

The table below shows recommended dosages for treating fibromyalgia and partial onset seizures in adults.

Condition Starting dosage Maintenance dosage Maximum dosage
fibromyalgia 75 mg two times per day 75 mg to 150 mg two times per day 225 mg two times per day
partial onset seizures* • 75 mg two times per day, or
• 50 mg three times per day
• 75 mg to 300 mg two times per day, or
• 50 mg to 200 mg three times per day
• 300 mg two times per day, or
• 200 mg three times per day

* Lyrica is used in combination with other medications for this condition.

As the table above shows, your doctor may change to a maximum dose, if needed. This increase may apply to the dosage for fibromyalgia or partial onset seizures.

Children’s dosage

Lyrica is approved for use in children ages 1 month and older only to treat partial onset seizures.

The table below shows recommended dosages for treating partial onset seizures in children younger than age 17 years. Children ages 17 years and older will take the recommended dosage for adults for this condition. See the table directly above for details.

Lyrica is used in combination with other medications for this condition. Some dosages of Lyrica are based on the child’s body weight.

Weight Starting dosage Maximum dosage
less than 30 kg* (less than 66 lb, approximately) 3.5 mg per kg (mg/kg) per day, divided into:
• two or three doses, in children ages 4 years to less than 17 years
• three doses, in children ages 1 month to less than 4 years
14 mg/kg per day, divided into:
• two or three doses, in children ages 4 years to less than 17 years
• three doses, in children ages 1 month to less than 4 years
30 kg or more (66 lb or more, approximately) 2.5 mg/kg per day, divided into:
• two or three doses
10 mg/kg per day, divided into:
• two or three doses (maximum of 600 mg per day)

* One kilogram (kg) is equal to about 2.2 pounds (lb).

For example, a 14-year-old child weighing 40 kg (about 88 lb) will take a starting dosage of 100 mg per day. The child’s doctor advises to divide this dosage into two doses of 50 mg each. Later, the child’s maximum dosage increases to 400 mg per day. The child’s doctor also advises to divide this dosage into two doses of 200 mg each.

For more information about the best dosage of Lyrica for your child, talk with your child’s doctor.

Length of treatment

Doctors typically prescribe Lyrica as a long-term treatment. You’ll likely take it long term if you and your doctor feel it’s safe and effective for your condition.

Lyrica: Common questions about dosage

Below are some common questions related to Lyrica’s dosage.

What is the max dosage of Lyrica?

The max dose of Lyrica that’s usually recommended depends on the condition you’re taking Lyrica to treat. For example, for nerve pain associated with diabetic neuropathy, the maximum recommended dosage is 300 mg per day. However, for nerve pain associated with spinal cord injury, the highest recommended dosage is 600 mg per day.

Before you start treatment with Lyrica, your doctor will recommend a treatment plan for you. They also may discuss the maximum dose of Lyrica for your condition.

See the “Lyrica: Dosage” section above for additional information.

Is there a Lyrica dosage for sleep?

No, Lyrica doesn’t have a recommended dosage for sleep. In fact, Lyrica is not approved for the treatment of sleep disorders, such as insomnia. So, it’s not known whether it may be safe or effective in this case.

However, a review of clinical study information Trusted Source PubMed Central Highly respected database from the National Institutes of Health Go to source about pregabalin (the active drug in Lyrica) was completed. It showed that Lyrica may be effective to help with sleep disturbances in people with various medical conditions. As such, it’s possible that your doctor could recommend using Lyrica off-label in certain cases. (With off-label use, a drug is prescribed for a use different from what it’s approved to treat.)

In this case, your doctor can help determine the right dosage of Lyrica for you.

Does Lyrica have a dosage for anxiety?

No, Lyrica doesn’t have a recommended dosage for anxiety. This is a mental health condition that leads to excessive worry or fear. In fact, Lyrica is not approved for treatment of anxiety. As such, it’s not known whether it may be safe or effective in this case.

However, clinical studies suggest that pregabalin (the active drug in Lyrica) may be effective for treating anxiety. As such, your doctor may recommend using Lyrica off-label for this use. (With off-label use, a drug is prescribed for a use different from what it’s approved to treat.)

If your doctor suggests using Lyrica for anxiety, they will recommend the right dosage for you.

Can my doctor prescribe me Lyrica for my sciatica? If so, what is the Lyrica dosage for sciatica?

It’s possible that your doctor may prescribe Lyrica for your sciatica off-label. (Sciatica is nerve pain that occurs in the lower back and down the leg. With off-label use, a drug is prescribed for a use different from what it’s approved to treat.)

However, Lyrica is not approved for treatment of sciatica pain. So, it’s not known whether it may be safe or effective in this case. Because of this, Lyrica doesn’t have a recommended dosage for this use.

Currently, clinical studies Trusted Source The New England Journal of Medicine Highly respected journal, Expert written journal, Peer reviewed journal Go to source do not show that Lyrica helps to significantly lessen symptoms of sciatica. It’s still possible that your doctor may recommend taking it for this use. If so, they can determine the right dosage for you.

Lyrica: Dosage considerations

Your doctor will consider several factors when prescribing the dosage for Lyrica. These factors include:

  • your age
  • weight, in children taking the drug
  • the condition you’re taking Lyrica to treat
  • the severity of your condition

Your prescribed dosage also may vary based on other medical conditions you have.

Recommended adjustments in dosage

If you have kidney problems, tell your doctor before starting Lyrica. Your kidneys should remove this medication from your body during the process of filtering waste products. However, if your kidneys aren’t working properly, the drug could build up in your body and cause side effects.

In this case, your doctor may recommend a lower dose of Lyrica.

Lyrica: How to take

Lyrica comes as an oral solution or capsule. You’ll take either form by mouth, usually two or three times per day. You can take your dose of Lyrica with or without food.

Your doctor may recommend that you take Lyrica around the same time each day. Doing so will help maintain a consistent amount of the drug in your body. This can help Lyrica work effectively.

Lyrica capsules should not be crushed, chewed, or opened. If you have difficulty swallowing capsules, view this article for suggestions on taking capsules. You also can talk with your doctor or pharmacist. If difficulty swallowing the capsules persists, your doctor may switch you to Lyrica’s oral solution form.

Do not suddenly stop taking Lyrica without first talking with your doctor. Stopping Lyrica suddenly may cause side effects, such as headaches, nausea, anxiety, or sweating. In some cases, you may be at an increased risk of seizures. Your doctor can determine the safe way to stop Lyrica and whether to start another medication instead.

To learn more about stopping Lyrica treatment, see the “Lyrica: Withdrawal and dependence” section below.

ACCESSIBLE DRUG LABELS AND CONTAINERS

If you find it challenging to read the label on your prescription, tell your doctor or pharmacist. Certain pharmacies provide medication labels with large print or braille. They may also offer labels containing a scannable code that your smartphone can convert from text to speech. If your pharmacy doesn’t provide these choices, your doctor or pharmacist may be able to recommend a pharmacy that does.

If it’s difficult for you to open medication bottles, ask your pharmacist if they can dispense Lyrica in an easy-open container. They also may recommend ways to help make it easier to open the bottles.

Lyrica: Missing a dose

If you miss a dose of Lyrica, take it as soon as you remember. However, if it’s almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the usual time. Never take two doses of Lyrica at a time to try to make up for a missed dose.

View these medication reminder options to help avoid missing doses. You could also set an alarm or download a reminder app on your phone.

Lyrica: Misuse

Lyrica is a controlled substance. These substances are controlled by the federal government because they have the potential to be misused. (With misuse, a drug is taken in a way other than how it’s prescribed. This could cause harm to you.)

If you have concerns about taking Lyrica, talk with your doctor before starting treatment.

Lyrica: Overdose

If you take more than the recommended dosage of Lyrica, serious effects can occur. Do not take more Lyrica than your doctor prescribes.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms that an overdose of Lyrica could cause include:

  • depression
  • anxiety
  • confusion
  • agitation
  • restlessness
  • seizures
  • heart problems
  • in rare cases, death

What to do in case of overdose

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much of this drug. Also, you can call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. However, if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or a local emergency number. Or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Lyrica: Withdrawal and dependence

Lyrica is a controlled substance. This means it’s controlled by the federal government because of the risks of misuse or dependence. (With misuse, a drug is taken in a way other than how it’s prescribed. With dependence, your body needs a drug to function like usual.)

It’s possible that Lyrica can cause drug dependence. Dependence can occur even if you’re taking Lyrica at the dosage prescribed by your doctor.

That said, do not suddenly stop taking Lyrica without first talking with your doctor. Stopping Lyrica suddenly can cause withdrawal symptoms. These withdrawal symptoms occur when your body is dependent on a drug that you suddenly stop taking.

Symptoms of withdrawal may include:

  • nausea
  • headache
  • anxiety
  • sweating
  • diarrhea
  • insomnia
  • seizures

If you need to stop taking Lyrica, your doctor likely will recommend decreasing your dosage slowly. This will occur over approximately 1 week, so your body can adjust to having less medication.

If you have questions or concerns about stopping Lyrica treatment, talk with your doctor.

Lyrica: What to discuss with your doctor

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist for additional information about Lyrica’s dosage. Keep in mind that the dosages presented in this article are typical dosages provided by the drug’s manufacturer. Your doctor will recommend the dosage of Lyrica that’s right for you and your condition. Always follow the dosage that your doctor prescribes for you.

As with any medications you’re taking, do not change your Lyrica dosage without a recommendation from your doctor. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns about your dosage.

In addition to discussing Lyrica with your doctor, you may find the following articles helpful in learning more.

  • Overview of Lyrica. For comprehensive details on Lyrica, see this article.
  • Drug comparisons. To learn how Lyrica compares with gabapentin, read this article.
  • Information on side effects. If you’d like to know about possible side effects of Lyrica, view this article.
  • Details about Lyrica’s uses. To learn more about the conditions Lyrica is used to treat, see the following articles:

Disclaimer: Healthgrades has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.


Medical Reviewer: Vrinda Rio, Pharm.D.
Last Review Date: 2022 Oct 19
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