Doxy 100 Doxycycline

Get an overview of DOXY 100 (doxycycline injection, powder, lyophilized, for solution), including its generic name, formulation (i.e. pill, oral solution, injection, inhaled medicine) and why it’s used. The medication in Doxy 100 can be sold under different names.

Refer to the “Also Known As” section to reference different products that include the same medication as Doxy 100.

Drug Basics

Brand Name: Doxy 100

Generic Name: DOXYCYCLINE

Drug Type: HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG

Route: INTRAVENOUS

Dosage Form: INJECTION, POWDER, LYOPHILIZED, FOR SOLUTION

Data Current As Of: 2020-03-02

indications & usage

To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Doxy-cycline for Injection, USP and other antibacterial drugs, Dooxycycline for Injection, USP should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Doxycycline for Injection, USP is indicated in infections caused by the following microorganisms:

  • Rickettsiae (Rocky Mountain spotted fever, typhus fever, and the typhus group, Q fever, rickettsial pox and tick fevers).
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae (PPLO, Eaton Agent).
  • Agents of psittacosis and ornithosis.
  • Agents of lymphogranuloma venereum and granuloma inguinale.
  • The spirochetal agent of relapsing fever (Borelia recurrentis).

The following gram-negative microorganisms:

  • Haemophilus ducreyi (chancroid).
  • Pasteurella pestis and Pasteurella tularensis.
  • Bartonella bacilliformis.
  • Bacteroides species
  • Vibrio comma and Vibrio fetus.
  • Brucella species (in conjunction with streptomycin).

Because many strains of the following groups of microorganisms have been shown to be resistant to tetracyclines, culture and susceptibility testing are recommended. Doxycycline is indicated for treatment of infections caused by the following gram-negative microorganisms when bacteriologic testing indicates appropriate susceptibility to the drug:

  • Escherichia coli.
  • Enterobacter aerogenes (formerly Aerobacter aerogenes).
  • Shigella species.
  • Mima species and Herellea species.
  • Haemophilus influenzae (respiratory infections).
  • Klebsiella species (respiratory and urinary infections).

Doxycycline is indicated for treatment of infections caused by the following gram-positive microorganisms when bacteriologic testing indicates appropriate susceptibility to the drug:

  • Anthrax due to Bacillus anthracis, including inhalational anthrax (post-exposure): to reduce the incidence or progression of disease following exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis.
  • Streptococcus species:

Up to 44% of strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and 74% of Streptococcus pyogenes and 74% of Streptococcus faecalis have been found to be resistant to tetracycline drugs. Therefore, tetracyclines should not be used for streptococcal disease unless the organism has been demonstrated to be sensitive.

For upper respiratory infections due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococci, penicillin is the usual drug of choice, including prophylaxis of rheumatic fever.

  • Diplococcus pneumoniae.
  • Staphylococcus aureus, respiratory, skin and soft tissue infections. Tetracyclines are not the drugs of choice in the treatment of any type of staphylococcal infections.

When penicillin is contraindicated, doxycycline is  and alternative drug in the treatment of infections due to:

  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis.
  • Treponema pallidum and Treponema pertenue (syphilis and yaws).
  • Listeria monocytogenes.
  • Clostridium species.
  • Fusobacterium fusiforme (Vincent's infection).
  • Actinomyces species.

In acute intestinal amebiasis, doxycycline may be a useful adjunct to amebicides.  Doxycycline is indicated in the treatment of trachoma, although the infectious agent is not always eliminated, as judged by immunofluorescence.

contraindications

This drug is contraindicated in persons who have shown hypersensitivity to any of the tetracyclines.

adverse reactions

Gastrointestinal

Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, glossitis, dysphagia, enterocolitis and inflammatory lesions (with monilial overgrowth) in the anogenital region. Hepatotoxicity has been reported rarely. These reactions have been caused by both the oral and parenteral administration of tetracyclines.

Skin

Maculopapular and erythematous rashes. Exfoliative dermatitis has been reported but is uncommon. Photosensitivity is discussed above (see WARNINGS)

Renal Toxicity

Rise in BUN has been reported and is apparently dose related (see WARNINGS)

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Urticaria, angioneurotic edema, anaphylaxis, anaphylactoid purpura, pericarditis and exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

Bulging fontanels in infants and benign intracranial hypertension in adults have been reported in individuals receiving full therapeutic dosages. These conditions disappeared rapidly when the drug was discontinued.

Blood

Hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and eosinophilia have been reported.

When given over prolonged periods, tetracyclines have been reported to produce brown-black microscopic discoloration of thyroid glands. No abnormalities of thyroid function studies are known to occur.


also known as

This drug label information is as submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is intended for informational purposes only. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.
Search Drugs and Medication

Or Browse by Name

Top Reads
  • Learn about drugs going generic in 2021 and how you may be able to save money on common prescription medication by switching to drugs coming off-patent.
    November 20, 2019
  • To make sure your medicines work as they should, here are some of the most common food-and-drug combinations to avoid.
    October 22, 2015
  • Get a list of the top 50 prescription drugs out of the annual 3 billion prescriptions filled at U.S. pharmacies.
    September 5, 2019
  • While medications are extremely useful in treating various diseases and conditions, sometimes they can cause unwanted side effects—one of which can be sexual dysfunction. Talk to your doctor if you’re taking any of these common medications that affect sex drive.
    September 23, 2016
  • Here’s a look at the most commonly abused prescription drugs.
    October 30, 2014

Love the Doctor Who Prescribed This Medication?

Top Drugs
  • Digestive health drugs manage diseases, disorders and conditions of the gastrointesinal system. They provide treatment and symptom relief for functional and structural problems with digestive organs.
  • Antibiotic, antifungal and antiviral drugs treat infectious diseases. They kill or stop the growth of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi and viruses.
  • Birth control medications are a form of contraception. They contain either a combination of estrogen and progestin or progestin alone. There are several forms of these hormones, but most combination products contain estrogen, ethinyl estradiol, and a progestin. They work by preventing ovulation and inhibiting fertilization and implantation.
  • Mental health drugs treat conditions that affect emotional, psychological and social well-being. Doctors frequently use mental health drugs in combination with various forms of therapy to help people manage these conditions.