BC Sinus Congestion and Pain - Warnings acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine maleate, phenylephrine hydrochloride

The FDA requires all potential medication risks for BC SINUS CONGESTION AND PAIN (acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine maleate, phenylephrine hydrochloride powder) be disclosed to consumers, no matter how rare. Here are the warnings and precautions for BC Sinus Congestion and Pain.

Warnings & Precautions

Liver warning: This product contains acetaminophen. Severe liver damage may occur if you take

  • more than 5 powders in 24 hours, which is the maximum daily amount
  • with other drugs containing acetaminophen
  • 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day while using this product

Allergy   Alert: Acetaminophen may cause severe skin reactions. Symptoms may include: skin reddening blisters rash. If a skin reaction occurs, stop use and seek medical help right away.

do not use

  • with any other drug containing acetaminophen (prescription or nonprescription). If you are not sure whether a drug contains acetaminophen, ask a doctor or pharmacist.
  • if you are now taking a prescription monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MOAI) (certain drugs for depression, psychiatric, or emotional conditions, or Parkinson’s disease), or for 2 weeks after stopping the MAOI drug. If you do not know if your prescription drug contains an MAOI, ask a doctor or pharmacist before taking this product.

ask a doctor before use if you have

  • liver disease
  • high blood pressure
  • diabetes
  • thyroid disease
  • glaucoma
  • heart disease
  • a breathing problem such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis
  • trouble urinating due to an enlarged prostate gland

ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are taking

  • the blood thinning drug warfarin
  • sedatives or tranquilizers

when using this product

  • do not exceed recommended dosage
  • drowsiness may occur
  • avoid alcoholic drinks
  • excitability may occur, especially in children
  • be careful when driving a motor vehicle or operating machinery
  • alcohol, sedatives and tranquilizers may increase the drowsiness effect

stop use & ask a doctor if

  • pain or nasal congestion gets worse or lasts more than 7 days
  • fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days
  • you get nervous, dizzy, or sleepless
  • redness or swelling is present
  • new symptoms occur

if pregnant or breast-feeding

ask a health professional before use

keep out of reach of children.

Overdose warning: Taking more than the recommended dose can cause serious health problems. In the case of overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) right away. Quick medical attention is critical for adults as well as for children even if you do not notice any signs or symptoms.

This drug label information is as submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is intended for informational purposes only. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.
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