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Arthralgia

By

Healthgrades Editorial Staff

What is arthralgia?

Arthralgia is pain in one or more of your joints. The pain may be described as sharp, dull, stabbing, burning or throbbing, and may range in intensity from mild to severe. There are many causes of arthralgia, including injury, infection, arthritis, and other ailments. The most common cause is arthritis, which is inflammation of the joints. There are many different types of arthritis.

Treatment for arthralgia will vary depending on the joint that is affected, the severity of the pain, and the underlying cause. Treatment will address the underlying cause and alleviate or manage symptoms. Minor arthralgia can be treated at home with over-the-counter medications that reduce pain and swelling, or by icing, taking warm baths, or stretching.

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More severe cases of arthralgia may benefit from medical procedures, such as steroid injections, joint aspiration, or physical therapy.

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Although life-threatening complications of arthralgia are rare, seek immediate medical care (call 911) if you, or someone you are with, have joint pain due to injuries that involve profuse bleeding or tissue damage, severe joint pain, or high fever (higher than 101 degrees Fahrenheit).

Seek prompt medical care if you are being treated for arthralgia but mild symptoms recur or are persistent.

Medical Reviewers: William C. Lloyd III, MD, FACS Last Review Date: Oct 29, 2016

© 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

View Sources

Medical References

  1. Joint pain. MedlinePlus, a service of the National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003261.htm
  2. Arthritis. PubMed Health, a service of the NLM from the NIH. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002223/
  3. Kahan S, Miller R, Smith EG (Eds.). In A Page Signs & Symptoms, 2d ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Williams, 2009
  4. Domino FJ (Ed.) Five Minute Clinical Consult. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013

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