Knowing When to Step Up Asthma Treatment

Many asthma patients are able to successfully control their symptoms, which generally include coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. When symptoms go uncontrolled, however, the quality of life for asthma patients can decrease dramatically and may lead to a medical emergency. If you start experiencing any of the following signs, talk to your doctor about adjusting your asthma treatment.

Medically Reviewed By: William C. Lloyd III, MD | Last Review Date: Oct 18, 2013

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Medical References

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  2. Uncontrolled Asthma. Contemporary Pediatrics Modern Medicine.com. http://contemporarypediatrics.modernmedicine.com/contemporary-pediatrics/news/modernmedicine/modern-...
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