Dr. Robert L. Stroud, MD http://cdn.hgimg.com/img/silhouettes/silhouette-male_w120h160_v1.jpg Get a Free Background Report on Dr. Robert L. Stroud, MD. Malpractice, medical malpractice, sanctions, misconduct, credentials, and penalty or negligence information.

Dr. Robert L. Stroud, MD

Internal Medicine

Male, Age 65, Graduated 1974, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON

4007 James Casey St Suite C120
Austin, TX 78745
About This ProviderAppointmentsPhone & AddressBackgroundPatient Satisfaction

Dr. Stroud's Specialty

  • Internal Medicine

What Is a Specialty or Area of Special Expertise?

A specialty is the branch of medicine in which a doctor has completed advanced clinical training and education. Most doctors are board certified in their specialty. To receive the best healthcare for your needs, consider choosing a doctor who specializes in your particular medical condition. A specialist will concentrate on your specific needs and will be familiar with the best treatment methods.

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A specialty is the branch of medicine in which a doctor has completed advanced clinical training and education. Most doctors are board certified in their specialty. To receive the best healthcare for your needs, consider choosing a doctor who specializes in your particular medical condition. A specialist will concentrate on your specific needs and will be familiar with the best methods of treatment. 

Examples of specialists are a pediatrician who focuses on the physical, emotional, and social health of children from birth to young adulthood; or a cardiologist who specializes in diseases and conditions of the heart and blood vessels. 

A doctor may have more than one specialty, along with one or more subspecialties. For instance, a doctor could specialize in internal medicine and have a subspecialty in infectious disease. A subspecialty is a concentration within a specialty. 

Your primary care doctor (who is often a specialist in family medicine or internal medicine) can help you choose the right type of specialist. In fact, some health insurance plans require a referral from your primary care doctor before you visit a specialist.

Dr. Stroud's License & Board Certification

  • Board Certified in Internal Medicine, 1979
  • Licensed in Texas

Why Is Board Certification Important?

Board certification requires extensive training and a rigorous review of a doctor’s knowledge, experience and skill in a medical specialty. Board certification also means that a doctor is actively improving his or her practice of medicine through continuing education. A board-certified doctor is more likely than a non-board-certified doctor to have the most current skills and knowledge about how to treat your medical condition. 

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Board certification requires extensive training and a rigorous review of a doctor’s knowledge, experience and skill in a medical specialty. Board certification also means that a doctor is actively improving his or her practice of medicine through continuing education. A board-certified doctor is more likely than a non-board-certified doctor to have the most current skills and knowledge about how to treat your medical condition. 

A doctor who is board certified has taken an important step beyond getting a required state medical license to practice. Some doctors choose not to apply for board certification. A doctor who is not board certified may be an excellent doctor who is fully licensed to practice medicine in his or her state. 

If you are considering a doctor who is not board certified, consider asking the doctor why he or she is not certified. This information might provide you important background information to help you decide whether or not to see that doctor.

Dr. Stroud does not have any procedures listed. If you are Dr. Stroud and would like to add procedures you perform, please update your free profile.

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Dr. Stroud's Education & Training

  • Medical Schools:

    • UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON
      Graduated: 1974
  • Residency Hospital:

    • Mayo Grad School Med/mayo Fndn
    • University Tx Med Branch Hosps

What Is a Residency?

Residency is a medical training program that a doctor completes to gain expertise in a specialty. To receive the best healthcare for your needs, consider choosing a doctor who has completed a residency and therefore specializes in the area of your particular medical condition. A specialist will concentrate on your specific needs and will be familiar with the best treatment methods. Read More

Residency is a medical training program that a doctor completes to gain expertise in a specialty. To receive the best healthcare for your needs, consider choosing a doctor who has completed a residency and therefore specializes in the area of your particular medical condition. A specialist will concentrate on your specific needs and will be familiar with the best treatment methods.

Examples of specialists are a pediatrician who focuses on the physical, emotional and social health of children from birth to young adulthood; or a cardiologist who specializes in diseases and conditions of the heart and blood vessels.

Residency training takes place in accredited hospitals or other healthcare facilities under the supervision of experienced doctors. Residency training lasts from three to seven years, and the exact duration varies from specialty to specialty. Residency is required for specialty board certification.

Dr. Stroud's Background Check

Malpractice

No malpractice history found for Texas
What is medical malpractice?
Medical malpractice is issued when negligence by a doctor causes injury to a patient. For example, a doctor may improperly diagnose, treat or medicate outside the standard of medical care. The three types of malpractice are: a settlement, an arbitration award, or a judgment.
If my doctor has malpractice history, does that mean he or she is a poor-quality doctor?
If your doctor has a malpractice claim, evaluate the information and determine if the action could potentially impact your quality of care. Claim settlements and arbitration awards may occur for a variety of reasons, which should not necessarily reflect negatively on the doctor's professional competence or conduct. You may want to use this information to start a discussion with the doctor about his or her history and specific ability to provide healthcare for you.
How far back does Healthgrades malpractice history go?
Healthgrades reports details of a doctor’s malpractice history when the doctor has at least one closed medical malpractice claim within the last five years, even if he or she no longer practices in that state.
For which states does Healthgrades collect malpractice history?
Healthgrades collects malpractice information for the states of California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. If your doctor has a malpractice claim, evaluate the information and determine if the action could potentially impact you quality of care. Sometimes multiple states report the same claim. If a provider practices in a state where data is unavailable, please reach out to your local state legislature to help make this data publicly available.

Sanctions

No sanctions history found for the years that Healthgrades collects data
What is a sanction or disciplinary action?
A sanction, also known as a disciplinary action, is an action taken to punish or restrict a doctor who has demonstrated professional misconduct. Sanctions may be imposed by a state medical board, professional medical licensing organization, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
If my doctor has sanction history, does that mean he or she is a poor-quality doctor?
If a doctor has a sanction, it does not necessarily mean that he or she is a poor-quality doctor. Some sanctions are not related to medical care, and involve a doctor’s finances or administrative activities. Before you make any choices about changing your doctor, we recommend that you evaluate the doctor’s sanction information and determine how severe or relevant you think the sanction cause and action were.
How far back does Healthgrades sanction history go?
Healthgrades reports state and federal sanctions from the previous five years, except when a doctor's license has been revoked or surrendered. Healthgrades displays all actions for doctors whose licenses have been revoked or surrendered. 
For which states does Healthgrades collect sanction history?
Healthgrades collects sanction history from all 50 U.S. states. Physicians with a disciplinary action in one state may move to another state where they have a clean record. Since Healthgrades painstakingly compiles disciplinary action information from all 50 states, Healthgrades website will show if a physician has a disciplinary action in more than one state. 

Board Actions

Board action history found

Other  (6/4/2010)
Action Taken: Agreed Order with Terms and Conditions
Allegation of Complaint: Dr. Robert Lee Stroud; License # E2888

Nature of Complaint:

In December 2007, the patient went to see the physician with complaints of severe pain in her fourth and fifth toes, which extended to the dorsum of her foot, which the physician diagnosed as likely secondary to gout. The physician ordered a uric acid level, prescribed a ten day trial of indomethacin, and instructed the patient to return for follow up in ten days. When the patient returned seventeen days later, the physician prescribed Allopurinol. The physician conservatively prescribed a low, 100mg dose of Allopurinol. The patient started taking the medication a couple months later, most likely due to increased pain. The patient returned in April 2008 with complaints of: fatigue, dyspnea, and exertion, light headedness and halo vision, anorexia, and nausea. When the patient returned for follow up on May 8, 2008, the physician discussed the patients’ most recent lab findings and discontinued the Allopurinol. On May 9, 2008, the physician admitted the patient to the hospital with anemia and ordered additional labs and transfusions. The patient quickly improved and was discharged the next day. After May 9, 2008, the patient declined to seek further medical treatment by the physician and did not share any further confidential medical information with him. Months later, the physician learned the patient had subsequently sought treatment in Dallas. Records are unavailable from that facility to determine the course of her medical treatment there, but the patient’s family member reported that she did on July 17, 2008.

Action Taken:

The Texas Medical Board Orders that the physician shall be subject, but not limited to, the following terms and conditions:

  1. The physician shall successfully complete courses in the subject areas of physician prescribing, and physician-patient communication, within one year from the date of the entry of this Order.
  2. The physician shall comply with all the provisions of the Act and other statutes regulating his practice.
  3. The physician shall fully cooperate with the Board and the Board staff.
  4. The physician shall be permitted to supervise and delegate prescriptive authority to physician assistants and advanced practice nurses and to supervise surgical assistants.
  5. This Order shall automatically terminate upon the physician’s submission of sufficient evidence that he successfully completed the requirement listed above, in number one.
State: Texas

What are board actions?
Board actions are non-disciplinary actions imposed upon a doctor based on a complaint investigation. A patient or medical colleague may file a complaint with that state medical board or professional licensing organization, which then investigates the complaint. Board actions are intended to ensure that a doctor is able to perform safe medical and health care tasks.
If my doctor has a board action, does that mean he or she is a poor-quality doctor?
If a doctor has a board action, it means he or she has had a non-disciplinary action imposed upon him or her. It does not necessarily mean that he or she is a poor quality doctor. Before you make any choices about changing your doctor, evaluate the doctor’s board action information and determine how severe or relevant you think the cause and action were. 
How far back does Healthgrades non-disciplinary board action history go?
Healthgrades reports non-disciplinary board action history from for the previous five years, except when a doctor's license has been revoked or surrendered. Healthgrades displays all actions for doctors whose licenses have been revoked or surrendered. 
For which states does Healthgrades collect non-disciplinary board actions?
Healthgrades collects non-disciplinary board actions from all 50 U.S. states. 

Dr. Stroud's Languages Spoken

  • English
  • Spanish
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