Dr. Cynthia L. Kooima, MD http://cdn.hgimg.com/img/prov/X/W/3/XW33D_w120h160.jpg Get a Free Background Report on Dr. Cynthia L. Kooima, MD. Malpractice, medical malpractice, sanctions, misconduct, credentials, and penalty or negligence information.

Dr. Cynthia L. Kooima, MD

Orthopedic Surgery

Female, Age 44, Graduated 1998, Michigan State University College Of Human Medicine

1760 Pecos Rd Suite 207
Gilbert, AZ 85295
About This ProviderAppointmentsPhone & AddressBackgroundPatient Satisfaction

Dr. Kooima's Care Philosophy

Active Orthopedic, a Division of OSNA, PLLC specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of the extremities (arms and legs) and joints (shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle) We work with the athletic, the weekend warrior, the active family, the senior who wants to remain active and independent, and the individual focused on an improved quality of life. We treat broken bones injured ligaments, and sore, achy, worn out joints. Our treatment may include: education, exercises, medication, bracing or splinting, casting, injections, and surgery when necessary. We emphasize conservative non-surgical care where possible, but maintain skills in the latest orthopedic surgical treatments.The Our physicians are Board Certified Fellows by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery and are fellowship trained specialists. We are committed to helping our patients lead an active life style from childhood to the golden years.

Dr. Kooima's Specialty

  • Orthopedic Surgery
  • Sports Medicine
  • Men's Sports Medicine

What Is a Specialty or Area of Special Expertise?

A specialty is the branch of medicine in which a doctor has completed advanced clinical training and education. Most doctors are board certified in their specialty. To receive the best healthcare for your needs, consider choosing a doctor who specializes in your particular medical condition. A specialist will concentrate on your specific needs and will be familiar with the best treatment methods.

Read More

A specialty is the branch of medicine in which a doctor has completed advanced clinical training and education. Most doctors are board certified in their specialty. To receive the best healthcare for your needs, consider choosing a doctor who specializes in your particular medical condition. A specialist will concentrate on your specific needs and will be familiar with the best methods of treatment. 

Examples of specialists are a pediatrician who focuses on the physical, emotional, and social health of children from birth to young adulthood; or a cardiologist who specializes in diseases and conditions of the heart and blood vessels. 

A doctor may have more than one specialty, along with one or more subspecialties. For instance, a doctor could specialize in internal medicine and have a subspecialty in infectious disease. A subspecialty is a concentration within a specialty. 

Your primary care doctor (who is often a specialist in family medicine or internal medicine) can help you choose the right type of specialist. In fact, some health insurance plans require a referral from your primary care doctor before you visit a specialist.

Dr. Kooima's License & Board Certification

  • Board Certified in Orthopedic Surgery, 2006
  • Licensed in Arizona

Why Is Board Certification Important?

Board certification requires extensive training and a rigorous review of a doctor’s knowledge, experience and skill in a medical specialty. Board certification also means that a doctor is actively improving his or her practice of medicine through continuing education. A board-certified doctor is more likely than a non-board-certified doctor to have the most current skills and knowledge about how to treat your medical condition. 

Read More

Board certification requires extensive training and a rigorous review of a doctor’s knowledge, experience and skill in a medical specialty. Board certification also means that a doctor is actively improving his or her practice of medicine through continuing education. A board-certified doctor is more likely than a non-board-certified doctor to have the most current skills and knowledge about how to treat your medical condition. 

A doctor who is board certified has taken an important step beyond getting a required state medical license to practice. Some doctors choose not to apply for board certification. A doctor who is not board certified may be an excellent doctor who is fully licensed to practice medicine in his or her state. 

If you are considering a doctor who is not board certified, consider asking the doctor why he or she is not certified. This information might provide you important background information to help you decide whether or not to see that doctor.

  • ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) Surgery
  • Ankle Fracture Repair
  • Arthoroscopic Surgery Reconstruction
  • Arthritic Hip Reconstruction Surgery
  • Arthritic Knee Reconstruction
  • Arthritic Shoulder Reconstruction
  • Arthrocentesis
  • Arthroscopic Glenoid Labrum Repair
  • Arthroscopic Joint Reconstruction
  • Arthroscopic Joint Surgery
More
  • Arthroscopic Labrum Repair
  • Arthroscopic Meniscus Repair
  • Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair
  • Arthroscopic Shoulder Reconstruction
  • Arthroscopic Surgery
  • Arthroscopic Upper-Extremity Surgery
  • Articular Cartilage Repair
  • Bicep Repairs
  • Bone & Joint Repair
  • Bone & Joint Replacement
  • Bursa Injections
  • Carpal Tunnel Release
  • Cartilage Repair
  • Cartilage Transplant
  • Casting
  • Elbow Surgery
  • Foreign Body Removal
  • Fracture Care
  • Fracture Open Reduction and Internal Fixation (ORIF)
  • Fracture/Dislocation Treatment
  • Glenoid Labrum Repair
  • Hardware Removal
  • Hip Arthroscopy
  • Hip Fracture & Dislocation Treatment
  • Hip Replacement
  • Joint Drainage
  • Joint Implants
  • Joint Injection
  • Joint Reconstruction Surgery
  • Joint Replacement Surgery
  • Joint Surgery
  • Knee & Leg Fracture & Dislocation Treatment
  • Knee Arthroscopy
  • Knee Cartilage Treatment
  • Knee Ligament Reconstruction
  • Knee Replacement
  • Knee Replacement Revisions
  • Knee Surgery
  • Lateral Meniscus Repair
  • Medial Meniscus Repair
  • Meniscectomy
  • Myofascial Trigger Point Injection
  • Nerve Block, Somatic
  • Neuroplasty
  • Non-Spinal Nerve Blocks
  • Open Reduction Internal Fixation (ORIF) of Hip Fracture
  • Patella Tendon Repair
  • Quadriceps Tendon Repair
  • Removal of Foreign Bodies
  • Reverse of Total Shoulder Replacement
  • Rotator Cuff Surgery
  • Shoulder Arthroscopy
  • Shoulder Cartilage Treatment
  • Shoulder Fracture & Dislocation Treatment
  • Shoulder Reconstruction
  • Shoulder Replacement
  • Shoulder Resurfacing
  • Shoulder Stabilizations
  • Shoulder Surgery
  • Simple Fracture Care and Casting
  • Splinting
  • Sports Medicine Related Procedures
  • Sports Medicine Surgery
  • Steroid Injections
  • Subcromial Decompression
  • Supartz® Injections
  • Synvisc® Injections
  • Total Joint Replacement
  • Total Knee Replacement
  • Total Shoulder Replacement
  • Trigger Point Injections
  • Viscosupplementation With Hyaluronate
Less
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Adhesive Capsulitis
  • Ankle Fracture
  • Ankle Injury
  • Ankle Sprain and Achilles Tendon Sprain or Rupture
  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) or Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Tear
  • Arm Fracture (incl. Elbow and Shoulder)
  • Arthritis
  • Arthritis of the Shoulder
  • Bursitis
  • Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Deposition Disease (CPPD)
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Chronic Neck Pain
  • Chronic Pelvic Pain
  • Clavicle Fracture
  • Complications of Joint Prosthesis
  • De Quervain's Disease
  • Degenerative Disc Disease
  • Degenerative Joint Disease in the Knee
  • Degenerative Joint Disease in the Shoulder
  • Elbow Disorders
  • Elbow Sprain
  • Enthesopathy of Hip (incl. Trochanteric Bursitis)
  • Foot Fracture
  • Fracture
  • Glenoid Labrum Tear
  • Hip Sprain
  • Internal Derangement of Knee
  • Knee Arthritis
  • Knee Dislocation (incl. Meniscal Tear)
  • Knee Injuries
  • Knee Ligament Rupture
  • Knee Pain
  • Knee Sprain
  • Knee Tendinitis
  • Lateral & Medial Epicondylitis (Tennis & Golf Elbow)
  • Leg Fracture Above Knee (incl. Hip)
  • Leg Fracture Below Knee (incl. Ankle)
  • Low Back Pain
  • Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Tear
  • Muscle Conditions
  • Orthopedic Disorders
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osteoarthritis of Hand or Wrist
  • Osteoarthritis of Hip
  • Osteoarthritis of Knee
  • Osteoarthritis of Shoulder
  • Osteopenia
  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome or Knee Pain
  • Pseudoarthrosis
  • Radiculopathy (Not Due to Disc Displacement)
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Rib Fracture
  • Rotator Cuff Injuries
  • Rotator Cuff Tear
  • Scapular Fracture
  • Sciatica (Not Due to Disc Displacement)
  • Shoulder Diseases
  • Shoulder Dislocation
  • Shoulder Disorders
  • Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
  • Shoulder Instability
  • Shoulder Muscle Strain
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Shoulder Separation
  • Shoulder Sprain
  • Shoulder Tendinitis
  • Simple Fractures
  • Spinal Stenosis
  • Sports Injuries
  • Sprain
  • Systemic Chondromalacia
  • Trigger Finger
  • Work-Related Injuries
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Dr. Kooima's Education & Training

  • Medical Schools:

    • Michigan State University College Of Human Medicine
      Graduated: 1998
  • Residency Hospital:

    • Henry Ford Hospital
      Graduated: 2003
  • Fellowship Hospital:

    • Institute For Bone and Joint Disorders
      Graduated: 2004

What Is a Residency?

Residency is a medical training program that a doctor completes to gain expertise in a specialty. To receive the best healthcare for your needs, consider choosing a doctor who has completed a residency and therefore specializes in the area of your particular medical condition. A specialist will concentrate on your specific needs and will be familiar with the best treatment methods. Read More

Residency is a medical training program that a doctor completes to gain expertise in a specialty. To receive the best healthcare for your needs, consider choosing a doctor who has completed a residency and therefore specializes in the area of your particular medical condition. A specialist will concentrate on your specific needs and will be familiar with the best treatment methods.

Examples of specialists are a pediatrician who focuses on the physical, emotional and social health of children from birth to young adulthood; or a cardiologist who specializes in diseases and conditions of the heart and blood vessels.

Residency training takes place in accredited hospitals or other healthcare facilities under the supervision of experienced doctors. Residency training lasts from three to seven years, and the exact duration varies from specialty to specialty. Residency is required for specialty board certification.

Dr. Kooima's Background Check

Malpractice

Healthgrades does not collect malpractice information for Arizona
What is medical malpractice?
Medical malpractice is issued when negligence by a doctor causes injury to a patient. For example, a doctor may improperly diagnose, treat or medicate outside the standard of medical care. The three types of malpractice are: a settlement, an arbitration award, or a judgment.
If my doctor has malpractice history, does that mean he or she is a poor-quality doctor?
If your doctor has a malpractice claim, evaluate the information and determine if the action could potentially impact your quality of care. Claim settlements and arbitration awards may occur for a variety of reasons, which should not necessarily reflect negatively on the doctor's professional competence or conduct. You may want to use this information to start a discussion with the doctor about his or her history and specific ability to provide healthcare for you.
How far back does Healthgrades malpractice history go?
Healthgrades reports details of a doctor’s malpractice history when the doctor has at least one closed medical malpractice claim within the last five years, even if he or she no longer practices in that state.
For which states does Healthgrades collect malpractice history?
Healthgrades collects malpractice information for the states of California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. If your doctor has a malpractice claim, evaluate the information and determine if the action could potentially impact you quality of care. Sometimes multiple states report the same claim. If a provider practices in a state where data is unavailable, please reach out to your local state legislature to help make this data publicly available.

Sanctions

No sanctions history found for the years that Healthgrades collects data
What is a sanction or disciplinary action?
A sanction, also known as a disciplinary action, is an action taken to punish or restrict a doctor who has demonstrated professional misconduct. Sanctions may be imposed by a state medical board, professional medical licensing organization, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
If my doctor has sanction history, does that mean he or she is a poor-quality doctor?
If a doctor has a sanction, it does not necessarily mean that he or she is a poor-quality doctor. Some sanctions are not related to medical care, and involve a doctor’s finances or administrative activities. Before you make any choices about changing your doctor, we recommend that you evaluate the doctor’s sanction information and determine how severe or relevant you think the sanction cause and action were.
How far back does Healthgrades sanction history go?
Healthgrades reports state and federal sanctions from the previous five years, except when a doctor's license has been revoked or surrendered. Healthgrades displays all actions for doctors whose licenses have been revoked or surrendered. 
For which states does Healthgrades collect sanction history?
Healthgrades collects sanction history from all 50 U.S. states. Physicians with a disciplinary action in one state may move to another state where they have a clean record. Since Healthgrades painstakingly compiles disciplinary action information from all 50 states, Healthgrades website will show if a physician has a disciplinary action in more than one state. 

Board Actions

No board actions found for the years that Healthgrades collects data
What are board actions?
Board actions are non-disciplinary actions imposed upon a doctor based on a complaint investigation. A patient or medical colleague may file a complaint with that state medical board or professional licensing organization, which then investigates the complaint. Board actions are intended to ensure that a doctor is able to perform safe medical and health care tasks.
If my doctor has a board action, does that mean he or she is a poor-quality doctor?
If a doctor has a board action, it means he or she has had a non-disciplinary action imposed upon him or her. It does not necessarily mean that he or she is a poor quality doctor. Before you make any choices about changing your doctor, evaluate the doctor’s board action information and determine how severe or relevant you think the cause and action were. 
How far back does Healthgrades non-disciplinary board action history go?
Healthgrades reports non-disciplinary board action history from for the previous five years, except when a doctor's license has been revoked or surrendered. Healthgrades displays all actions for doctors whose licenses have been revoked or surrendered. 
For which states does Healthgrades collect non-disciplinary board actions?
Healthgrades collects non-disciplinary board actions from all 50 U.S. states. 

Dr. Kooima's Awards & Recognitions

Awards

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